Līču-Laņģu Sandstone Cliffs

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Are you ready for some Latvian forest walk?

Why not combine it with a visit to a couple of caves.

Visit Licu Langu sandstone cliffs near Cesis, and you’ll get both. Situated close to a small town, the cliffs are easy to get to, while at the same time you truly feel out in the nature there. It can be a very short visit, if you’re short on time, or you can spend the whole day in the area and visit a few other places as well. More on this further below.

But let’s start with Licu Langu sandstone cliffs.

1. Licu Langu Sandstone Cliffs: Basics

It’s a short walking / hiking trail.

The sandstone cliffs are approximately 0.6 miles / 1 km long. There is a walking trail along them, and a few other trails in the area if you decide to go on a longer hike. River Gauja is close to the place. You can’t see it from the cliffs, but you can get to it by following one of the trails.

LOCATION:

DISTANCE & TIME: starting from 2.5 miles / 4 km (60 – 90 minutes).

ENTRANCE: free.

TIPS: follow the map closely, as it’s very easy to miss the biggest part of the cliffs. Just as I experienced myself.

2. How to Get to Licu Langu Sandstone Cliffs

Going to Licu Langu Cliffs
Walking to Licu Langu Cliffs

Even though, they are outside big cities, it’s very easy to get to the cliffs.

Two of the easiest ways include going by train from Riga, Sigulda, Cesis or Valmiera, or by car. You can go there also on a day trip from Riga to Cesis.

If you’ll be coming by train, the train stop is called Lode.

If you’re coming by car, go to the same place.

There are only a few trains a day, so plan your time accordingly.

When you get off the train, just go to the station. It’s a very small building, which was closed when we were there. Just behind it is a road. Cross it, and you can start walking. There is the first sign (in the photo above).

If you need a shop, you’ll have to follow the train tracks for a couple of minutes. And there you’ll find a shop. The town is small, so there are only a few shops.

There are only a few trains a day, so plan your time accordingly.

The tricky part is that there are only a few signs.

So it’s very easy to miss the actual cliffs (as I experienced myself).

The biggest part is to the left from the stairs. Not to the right, where’s only a small part of the cliffs, and which seems like the most obvious direction to head to. On the map this part is called Licu Langu klintis (Licu Langu Cliffs). The biggest part is the direction of Langu klintis (Langu Cliffs).

3. Liela Ellite Cave (Devil’s Oven)

A view from a cave in Latvia
A view from a cave – Devil’s Oven

Devil's Oven cave

Devil's Oven

Would you like to spend more time in the area?

Check out the Devil’s Oven (Lielā Ellīte).

It’s a small cave in the same town, where is the train stop. Only a 10-minute walk away from the train station. Just follow the Google Maps to get there.

4. Hike to Grivinu Rock

Standing next to Grivinu rock
Standing next to Grivinu rock

Just a short walk further is this place – Grivinu rock.

It’s 1.4 miles / 2.2 km from this exact point Licu Langu klintis (Licu Langu Cliffs). There’s also a sign next to the cave.

Grivinu rock sign

From here you can walk in at least 2 different ways / on 2 trails.

When in doubt, just follow the map on your phone.

It’s a beautiful and a bit adventurous forest trail. In some places it gets pretty steep and can be slippery. Trail running competitions are being held here once in a while.

More photos below.

5. Licu Langu Sandstone Cliffs: My Experience

I’m from Latvia, but up until about a year ago I hadn’t heard of this place.

But then more and more people in Latvia started to talk about. And since we had no any other ideas, where to go this week, we decided to go and check out the “Līču-Laņģu Sandstone Cliffs”. The place is a little bit away from everything, it’s a 2-hour train ride away from Riga, but it is possible to get there by public transportation as well.

So, the plan was born.

We got to Lode train station. Went to Liela Ellite Cave (Devil’s Oven), and to the cliffs right afterwards. For the first part it looks just like a regular forest in Latvia. But as you get closer, the terrain changes and it gets more interesting. In the end we weren’t that impressed by the place. On Instagram it looks more impressive.

But then we learned that we had missed the biggest part of it.

Happens. Also if you are a local.

After the cliffs we went to Grivinu rock.

It was a very nice walk in the forest.

Until it started raining heavily. And we went back to the train station.

Here are a few more photos from our visit.

Lode clay deposit
Lode clay deposit

Walking near Lode clay deposit

Cave near Līču-Laņģu Sandstone Cliffs
Cave near Līču-Laņģu Sandstone Cliffs

 

Forest trail in Latvia
Forest trail to Grivinu rock

Bushes next to a trail in Latvian forest

Picking wild berries in Latvia

Wild berries in Latvia

Wild mushrooms in the forest in Latvia

Walking in the forest

Walking on a trail running trail

Have you been to Latvia? Did you go to Cesis? Did you visit Licu Langu Cliffs? What was your experience?

Book Your Trip Like a PRO

1. Book Your Flight

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2. Book Your Accommodation

Booking.com, Agoda.com and Airbnb. I use Booking and Agoda at least a dozen times a year, and Airbnb – when looking for a long-term stay. My best tip is to ALWAYS compare the price. Sometimes the same hotel is cheaper on Booking.com, other times – on Agoda. Always compare the price!

3. Buy Your Travel Insurance

World Nomads and SafetyWings are two companies I can recommend. World Nomads offers some extra benefits, that will be important for those doing some higher risk activities, while SafetyWings is significantly cheaper. SafetyWings is only $9.25 / week.


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